Sheldon Jottings for September 2016

What a fabulous Fell Race evening and a super Sheldon Day.

A  record 216 entries for the Fell Race and a wonderfully warm and calm evening made for probably the best fell race ever. Thanks of course to all the hard work put in by Phil organising the event and the expertise of Jo, Jenny, Marlene and Pat signing in and recording so many runners, the event was a miracle of slick organisation. Due to the often forgotten car parking crew and the Marshals  positioned around the 4 mile course, it all went without a hitch. Thanks to the expertise of Al and the recorders at the end of the race,  everyone very quickly had their positions and times.

This year the winner was Jack Ross from Staffordshire Midlands Club in a time of 23 minutes 54 seconds. The first lady was Steph Curtis from the Pennine Club in 30:13. The first local runner was Matt Nichols from Bakewell in 27:42. Well done to them and all who ran. The event raised a cool £1080! Well done Phil and all his crew.

Then Sheldon Day dawned fine and what a day!  The visitors just kept coming – numbers must have been a record. Spare a thought for those who parked a record number of cars – well done lads!  All went without a hitch – well nearly!  The baker only started to bake the scones for cream teas at 11o’clock, so they arrived, still warm, 5 minutes before the doors were due to open. Have you ever tried to put cream on warm scones? They were put in the fridge to cool – so all was well and everyone enjoyed them immensely!

As people streamed into the village the cake stall was a magnet as usual, selling more cakes, jams and chutneys  than ever. As they headed for the playing field, having a try at Splat the Rat, Find the Golden Nail, the Lucky Dip  then visiting all the stalls on the way, the band added that English summer time feel to the day .Many always feel drawn to our little Church and they were hugely rewarded with that powerful sense of calm and a  magnificent flower display. Then Stephen sat down to play the organ – a lovely touch which was completely spontaneous – the Church became packed.

If you managed to get to the playing field you will have seen the many popular attractions including a wonderful display of vintage cars and tractors, animals, a magician, the dog show and so much else. All those who organised the day and those who took part in whatever capacity – and there were many unsung heroes – can be justly proud of what our small village achieved. The grand total of £4,143 (after expenses) was a record. But what was even more impressive was the number of people who said that the village had given them a truly wonderful day out.  Well done Sheldon!!!

We hear that Lindsey’s Springer Spaniel, Beau, has given birth to 8 puppies. All are doing well, although things must be pretty hectic in that household!  All have good homes to go to. There is also a new dog called Gyp at Top Farm  who will be helping Oliver with the work around the farm.

In July the History Group was invited by the Peak District Mines Historical Society to a small celebration at Magpie Mine as they had secured lottery money to do urgent repair work on one of the chimneys. Some dignitaries were also there and as the scaffolding was already in situ we were able (suitably dressed in high viz vests and hard hats) to follow a guide and climb to the top to see the work going on. Believe us it was a brilliant  adventure and the 360 degree views were tremendous.

BOOK LAUNCH – September 21st  at the first Sheldon History Group meeting a new book will be launched.   ‘FW GOES TO WAR’ by Brian Greasley tells the story of Frederick Brocklehurst, the father of Tom Brocklehurst of Ashford. It is thanks to Tom and his generosity, foresight and knowledge that the book was written.  FW was born in Sheldon, lived at Woodbine Farm, went to Sheldon School and at 13 left to work on his father’s farm. The book tells of work in the village up to 1914 when FW volunteered to join the army to fight in WW1.  This 182 page book with numerous illustrations uses the archive of over 250 letters he wrote to his sister Clarice,  plus the diary he kept, to give a vivid account of what it was like to be an ordinary front line soldier during 4 years of war.

FW arrived in France as a member of the Grenadier Guards in October 1915 and was wounded in the Battle of the Somme 11 months later. The book, through the letters and diary, recounts stories of other men from the village who served, and the happenings and concerns of the village during this traumatic time. After returning to England to recover from his wounds he went back to France to join his Battalion, served in the trenches and suffered from a gas attack in the Battle of Passchendaele in 1917. He spent his convalescence in the north of England where he met his future wife, Rose, finishing his service as a Guards Physical and Musketry Instructor.

Come to Sheldon Village Hall at 7.30 on 21st September to help us launch this delightful book – with tea, coffee or a glass of wine and small buffet. You will be able to buy a copy of the book for just £5 and gain other insights into this remarkable story.

The lucky winner of the Church Draw for July was Ben Hatcher with no 8 and for August it was Oliver with no 2.  Congratulations both!

Leave a Reply