Sheldon Jottings for February 2017

February is the month of the snowdrops. They have been pushing their green shoots through the ground for a couple of months with small white flashes showing since the middle of January. Soon their white carpet will be spreading through the hellebores, bringing the garden to life to cheer us through the cold winter days.

This month is also the middle of winter in Sheldon. We have already been warned of icy and snowy mornings and because we so rarely have the gritter now, accidents have already happened down Kirk Dale. A very long stretch of wall has been knocked down by a colliding vehicle. Indeed the road was closed by the police for some time after this collision.

Has anyone else noticed, when, joining Kirk Dale nothing has been seen coming down from the top of the Dale – but progressing downwards for a short distance a vehicle is suddenly behind us having travelled so fast down the length of the Dale. This road is indeed very much a rat – run nowadays for commuters who, for some inexplicable reason cannot take on board its dangers regarding its downwards trajectory and its bends – and the weather conditions.

The atrocious high winds of January 11th left their mark as a field barn roof took off and a wonderful, very old ash tree on Hage Lane lost a large limb. We are so pleased that our Parish Council have had all our village street trees inspected, not only for human safety but also because they are so close to houses.

Also on the morning of the 11th around 8.15 I was walking down the street to post a letter when wave after wave after wave of starlings flew overhead, battling against the wind to reach their feeding grounds to the south of Sheldon. It was an amazing sight…

Despite the difficult weather we can experience in Sheldon, as always there is a silver lining. We do have some exceptionally clear days as the clean arctic air sweeps across us and the views from the village when this is the case (particularly to the north) are spectacular.

We have seen very few hares this year in the fields. They are difficult to see at the best of times, but there seem to be fewer around at the moment. On days when snow lies on the ground however they reveal their presence as they move from their snow hides leaving their tell-tale tracks across the snow. If this happens it will give us a good indication of whether their numbers have declined or whether old eyes are unable to pick them out as they lie in the grass or dash across the fields and over the walls.

The ‘Old Folks’ – that is those over 65, would like to thank Kath and her team at the ‘Cock and Pullet’ for an excellent Christmas Dinner. We had a great time with good cheer and lively chat. Tony won the raffle prize of a bottle of Port and Sam was given whisky when he cheekily suggested one would go well with his Christmas pudding!!  The dinner is paid for by the village (via Sheldon Day) so we thank you all for this opportunity for us to get together once a year and to enjoy each other’s company.

This month’s meeting of the History Group takes place at the Village Hall on Wednesday 15th February. The meeting is the opportunity for anyone to bring an artefact of any description from kitchen utensil to peculiarly shaped stone, from farming implement to old coin – indeed anything which might be of interest. Tell the meeting what it is and what it is used for or if you don’t know perhaps someone will be able to identify it.  We hope also to show some old photos of people who lived in the village in years gone by.  Do come, you will be very welcome.

The lucky winner of the Church Draw for January was no. 82 – Joe Tibbles. Congratulations!

Sheldon Jottings for March 2016

A walk in ‘our patch’ in mid-February showed the effects of the unusually mild winter continuing as the days begin to draw out. Patches of hawthorn were beginning to turn the lovely fresh green which we will see to full effect in spring. In sheltered spots, favoured by the sun to warm them, were the occasional primrose and cowslip daring to show us a splash of their wonderful pale yellow – one of the most beautiful colours of spring.  ‘Our’ spring/summer resident song thrush was back almost to the day, singing in the tops of the trees. We are told he probably goes down to Shacklow Wood to spend the winter where conditions are not so harsh. We also saw a bullfinch resplendent with its red breast, bright and shiny ready for courting – easily rivalling that of the robin on a nearby tree. Even the blackcaps at the feeder were clothed in the brighter colours of spring. All this at least a month earlier than expected. But what lies in store?  Will this weather hold? Will everything be checked before the full beauty of Spring arrives in our spectacular part of the world?

Terrific news – Melanie and Oliver have become engaged to be married.  Needless to say all at Top Farm are delighted. Congratulations from us all.

Two horse chestnut trees have been planted in the far corner of the playing field. The dream is that in years to come village children will collect the fruit and be able to play the time honoured game of ‘conkers’ as they did in the past.

Small piles of grit have appeared down the Dale.  We must thank Joel for getting the grit and for distributing it.  Anyone who has lived in Sheldon for a few years is aware of the dangers of snow and ice on the hill, so we are all grateful to Joel for this service.

The History Group had a super meeting last month with Tony telling us the background to the redevelopment of Hope Cottage which is one of the oldest houses in the village. Amanda told us of the history of Barleycorn Croft, which could well have been built by a mining company, and of the succession of people who have lived there.

In March, we look forward to The Annual Exhibition put on by the History Group in the village hall. This will take place on Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th March from 10.00 – 4.00pm on each day. Not only will this include a photographic display but also a range of artifacts ranging from stone-age flints to 20th century household and farming implements. If you have anything relevant to the historic record of Sheldon and its people and you think others may like to see, please bring it/them along. This is a popular event, entry is free and there is always a cup of tea plus cake and biscuits to welcome you!  There is something to interest everyone and we look forward to seeing you there.

At the Parish Meeting held on February 10th we learnt that the defibrillator has been delivered to the village and will shortly be installed on an outside wall of the village hall. A training session will be held so that we all know what it looks like and how easy it is to use it in order to help someone in need.

It is that time again when Lindsey will be asking for volunteers to help with cream teas this summer at the village hall. These raise much needed funds for the upkeep of the hall which is so vital as a centre for our village activities. Thanks to Lindsey for organising these.

The lucky Church Draw winner for February was number 28 –  Mary Barber from Monyash.

Finally and sadly, we end by saying that Alistair is stepping down from the position of Parish Chair at our next AGM.  He says he has thoroughly enjoyed the experience but feels other pressures mean he must relinquish the post.  We have all felt that during his office the village has been in safe hands and that he has done an excellent job. We must now elect a successor at the Parish Meeting  AGM on April 13th. So, can we all ask, cajole or arm – twist any one of the many suitable people who live in our village to continue the good work??

Sheldon Jottings for February 2016

Early in January the snowdrops were already showing white and some even nodding their heads. The aconites in the warmer parts of the garden were opening their yellow flowers and the white and purple of the hellebores were ready to begin their annual display. We are promised much colder weather during the latter part of winter so those plants beginning to grow in answer to the mild weather will need watching.

Virtually all the animals are inside now sheltered from what may come, only the hardiest are still outside. The first lambs have appeared in the fields on our route to Buxton and have been outside since they were first noticed at the end of December.

Increasingly large flocks of starlings are flying over the village on their early morning and twilight journeys to and from feeding in the fields towards Monyash and Flagg, from their roost on Middleton Moor.  However, we are told numbers are well down on last year. The jackdaws are beginning to investigate the openings, nooks and crannies of the tithe barn looking for nesting sites. We hear that two collared doves have already started building a nest. They may have to put their efforts on hold if colder weather comes!

There is a Parish Meeting this month on Wednesday 10th February in the Village Hall at 7.30pm, we look forward to seeing you there. As always there will be a welcoming cup of tea and cake, good companionship and interesting discussion. The Parish Meeting is arguably the most democratic method of local governance, where everyone can attend the meeting, give their opinion and vote on the many issues which occur, even in a small village like ours. Your opinion is much valued so come along and join in.

The following Wednesday 17th February at 7.30pm in the Village Hall is the next meeting of the History Group. Again there is the opportunity to enjoy a welcoming cup of tea or coffee and a piece of cake. It is always a relaxing evening with the bonus that we learn something new about the area in which we all live. This meeting is of particular interest as it is entitled ‘Top Farm’ and is an illustrated talk about one of our three fully functioning farms. At one time almost every family in the village was engaged in farming in one form or another, but times have changed and here is a unique opportunity to learn more about a subject in which we surely all have an interest. You will be made very welcome.

If anyone would like a 15 page booklet ‘A brief history of Magpie Mine –  a guide for visitors’, they are being sold  (£1 at Hope Cottage) on behalf of The Peak District Mines Historical Society. It is a very useful little booklet, short, concise and illustrated, and a good read for locals and for visitors to the area.

The lucky winner of the Church Draw for January was number 98 – Tim Robinson from Reapsmoor.

DATES FOR THE DIARY

Wednesday February 10th – Parish Meeting
Village Hall at 7.30pm

Wednesday February 17th – History Group talk ‘Top Farm’
Village Hall at 7.30pm

Sheldon Jottings for April 2015

Hopefully, we have seen the last of snow and the weather is beginning to improve as Spring is almost upon us. The snowdrops are still looking wonderful up here and the daffodils are beginning to bud up nicely. Many of us have helped to provide some food and water for the birds throughout Winter and they will now be thinking of nest building. The male chaffinches in particular are looking really smart.

With Easter comes Cream Teas – arrangements are well in hand – the Hall is looking superb after its refurbishment, people have volunteered to help and the scones, cream and jam are ordered. Don’t forget there is a sales table at each Cream Tea Day so we would be very grateful for any produce to sell in order to help swell the funds. The first Cream Tea Day is on Sunday April 5th from 2pm until 5pm in the Village Hall; we hope to see you there!

A new venture this year is a Table Top Sale to be held on Sunday April 26th in the Village Hall to raise funds, so hopefully we will all go along to give our support.

As we all know, Adrienne was taken to hospital recently and was quite poorly for a time but is now much better and is on her way to a full recovery. Both Adrienne and Elaine would like to thank everyone who sent her good wishes, cards and gave their support at a difficult time.

The Parish Meeting AGM takes place on Wednesday 8th April at 7.30pm. At this meeting we reflect on the progress we have made during the past year, receive reports from the Committees and look forward to the year to come. We would like to express our heartfelt thanks to our Chair, Alistair, for all his hard work and for steering us through the year.

Our local First Medical Responder, Tom Bailey, lives in Great Longstone and has written below, a summary of his valuable work. As we live so far from the hospital we may have our First Responder get to us before an ambulance can, so it is comforting to know we are not too disadvantaged living so far from Chesterfield.

Our emergencies have followed the usual pattern of mostly medical incidents but a fair amount have been trauma with a few road collisions, sporting and leisure injuries.

Several have been in Longstone, others in surrounding villages.

As some of you will have experienced the role of the MFR is not just to provide immediate care while waiting for an ambulance. Some patients may be assessed and referred to primary care, GP or out of hours services, minor injury units or to accident and emergency either under your own steam or by ambulance as required. Another function is to support ambulance crews and solo responders at incidents where extra hands are needed. The local team of 3 MFRs has been expanded recently to 4.

May I remind you to ensure your house names and numbers are clear and easily seen from the road as this will greatly speed up our response to you. If it is dark, put your front lights on, or the hazard lights on the car in your drive if it is safe and appropriate to do so. House names are hard to find so anything to help is greatly appreciated, as is informing our control room of any directions or landmarks to help identify where your property is.

A happy Easter to you all.

DATES FOR THE DIARY

Sunday April 5th – 2pm Village Hall
Cream Tea Day

Wednesday April 8th – 7.30pm Village Hall
Sheldon Parish Meeting AGM

Sunday April 26th – 10am Village Hall
Table Top Sale

Farm Watch event heads to Bakewell to help cut rural crime

Farm WatchFarmers are being encouraged to sign up to a scheme dedicated to helping to cut rural crime and protecting Derbyshire’s farming communities.

Officers will be heading out on the road for a day long Farm Watch event in a bid to raise awareness of the scheme and encouraging farmers to increase their security to protect themselves from crime.

The event will run from 9am at the Agricultural Centre, Bakewell on Monday, March 10.

Farm Watch is a free service which is led by police and partners including Derbyshire Dales and High Peak local authorities, Derbyshire County Council and the NFU.

The pioneering project allows messages to be spread quickly around crime prevention advice, witness appeals and information to anyone signed up to it.

The messages are sent by text, email and voice messages and can be sent to hundreds of people at a time, pinpointed to a specific area.

Farmers who are not already in the scheme will be able to sign up and will receive a free Farm Watch pack.

During the event, Safer Neighbourhood officers will be on hand to offer crime prevention advice around boosting home and farm security and will be offering discounted security products to help prevent rural crime.

Horse owners will also be able to sign up to the dedicated Horse Watch scheme and will receive a free membership pack containing advice and guidance to help prevent and detect equine crime.

Representatives from Smartwater, Datatag, NFU and Autoglass will also be available for advice about their products.

Crime should not be reported via Farm Watch but instead by calling 101 or 999 in an emergency. You can also call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

For more information about the event, call Bakewell Safer Neighbourhood team on 101.